Your Veterinarian Needs Help

Your Veterinarian Needs Help

(This press release may be reprinted in part or entirety by any print or broadcast media outlet, or used by any means of social media sharing.)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Your veterinarian chose to dedicate his or her life to the altruistic pursuit of tending to the health and lives of pets. What you may not have considered is that the health and life of your veterinarian also needs protecting: he or she is nearly four times more likely to die by suicide than someone among the general population. But there are ways you can help.

Sandy Weaver, author of the groundbreaking new book Happy Vet Happy Pet: Caring for Your Pet’s Caregiver, is on a mission to ease the lives of veterinarians, one client’s heart at a time.

“I’ve known for years, as have those in the veterinary field, that there was an issue with suicide and veterinarians,” Sandy says. “Then in early 2019, the CDC report on veterinary suicide was published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, and what had been anecdotal became data: male veterinarians are 2.1 times more likely, and female veterinarians are 3.5 times more likely, to complete suicide than their non-veterinarian peers.”

Happy Vet Happy Pet is a distillation of Sandy’s research into neuroscience, neuroplasticity and positive psychology mixed with data from the CDC report. The result is an impactful approach that weaves easy-to-understand science with stories that touch the minds and the hearts of pet owners — empowering them to be part of the solution.

Chapters dive deep into topics all pet owners should understand, including:

1. The heart, mind and life of a person who decides to become a veterinarian;
2. The very human, very vulnerable person behind the scrubs;
3. The ways clients unknowingly mistreat their pets’ caregivers;
4. Three simple rules to follow to help your veterinary team; and
5. What to do if you feel that someone near you is facing suicidal desperation.

Happy Vet Happy Pet shares Sandy’s unique point of view that it takes a village to save a veterinarian. “Making pet owners mindful of how their behavior impacts their veterinarian mobilizes the village to help solve the problem,” she adds.

This book will change your relationship with your veterinarian and their team forever. And what you learn in this book could save your veterinarian’s life.

Author Sandy Weaver is an expert speaker, trainer, mastermind facilitator and lover of all things dog.

As the Program Director of the Center for Workplace Happiness, Sandy creates the training programs, workshops, mastermind groups and keynotes that help people lead happier, more successful lives. She is also a citizen-scientist in the fields of neuroscience, neuroplasticity and positive psychology. In 2019, she took the resilience tools and strategies she’d been teaching to general audiences and crafted programs specifically for veterinary teams. Her goal is to touch the life of every veterinarian and technician in a way that helps them avoid the pain and despair that comes with an inability to manage stress.

Now in her 40th year of Siberian Husky ownership, Sandy is a passionate advocate for veterinarians and their teams and an ongoing donor to Not One More Vet.

For more information, please visit www.centerforworkplacehappiness.com, https://sandyjweaver.com, or connect with the author on social media at https://www.facebook.com/SandyJWeaver/.

Happy Vet Happy Pet: Caring for Your Pet’s Caregiver
Publisher: Panoma Press
Release Date: January 29, 2021
ISBN-10: 1784529311
ISBN-13: 978-1784529314
Available from https://www.amazon.com/Happy-Vet-Pet-Caring-Caregiver/dp/1784529311/

Trish Stevens
Chloe Taylor
Ascot Media Group, Inc.
Post Office Box 2394
Friendswood, TX 77549
news@ascotmedianews.com
www.ascotmedia.com
281.333.3507 Phone

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